Monday, September 16, 2019

How and Why Car Dealers Sell You Things You Don’t Need or Want (or even know about)

If you bought a new car recently, the probability is almost 100% that there were products and services added by the car dealer to the price you paid for the car. You may not even know that you paid extra for items like interior fabric protector, paint sealant, rental car assistance, roadside assistance, nitrogen in your tires, glass etching, pin stripes, and window tint. The one thing all these items have in common is that they’re over-priced. The markups on these products are much higher than any factory accessory installed by the manufacturer. Factory accessories like cruise controls, sunroofs, and navigation systems are marked up in the range of 15% to 25%. Dealer installed accessories are marked up 100% to 500% and higher.

Non factory installed accessories are also pre-installed by auto distributors. When cars first were retailed in the early 20th century, they were sold to the retail buyer through dealerships that were owned by the factories like GM, Chrysler, and Ford. This evolved as sales grew to factory owned distributors that distributed cars to independent dealers. When imported cars like Honda, Nissan (Datsun), Mazda, and Toyota became popular, they were mostly sold through independently owned distributorships that established networks of car dealers. Most of these distributorships have vanished and the manufacturers sell most of their car directly to independent car dealers. The largest and most notable exception is Southeast Toyota (SET) headquartered in South Florida. SET buys all their new Toyotas directly from Toyota and resells them to all the Toyota dealerships in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Alabama.

Because Toyota is, by far, the best-selling vehicle in the Southeast USA, the impact of the non-factory, pre-installed package named “ToyoGuard” is worthy of mention. Most Toyota dealerships in the Southeast and nearly all in South Florida order most of its cars with this distributor installed accessory package. The platinum ToyoGuard package retail price is $699. The cost to the dealer (if he orders at least 75% of his vehicles so equipped) is only $225. That’s a 311% markup! I’m not sure what the actual cost to Southeast Toyota is, but it’s probably a lot less than $225. Included in this package are fabric protection, paint sealant, rental car assistance, roadside assistance, 2 oil changes, and 4 tire rotations. One can debate the value of this “$699” package, but the fact that the true cost to the dealer is only $225 and the true cost to SET is less than that is indisputable.

The fact that the true cost of ToyoGuard and all dealer installed accessories is a tiny fraction of the retail price is not the main reason I object to them. The main reason is that I believe the retail buyer of a new car is entitled to choose the accessories on the car she buys. Extra, over-priced accessories on an “addendum label” next to the factory window sticker are likely not something the buyer wants or, most likely, even knows about.

I fully support the right of car dealers and distributors to sell extra accessories to their customers. But the features, benefits, and value of these accessories should be presented first, and sold only if their customer agrees that they are a true value at the price charged. When a car dealer or distributor adds accessories to almost every car he sells before the retail customer has a chance to say “no”, it’s ethically and morally wrong.

To avoid being duped into buying something you didn’t want or know about, always ask the salesman this question. “Does the advertised price and the price you quoted me include any accessories that were not installed by the vehicle manufacturer?”

Monday, September 09, 2019

11 RED FLAGS TO WATCH FOR WHEN BUYING A CAR


(1) The “Big Sale Event”. If you look in today’s newspaper, you will find that most car dealers in your area are having a sale of some kind. It may be because of a current holiday, “too large an inventory” of cars, to “reduce their taxes”, “the manager is out of town”, or some other nefarious lure. Advertising 101 says that you should give the prospective buyer a “motive to act”. Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter whether the motive is real or not. The fact is that most car dealers do not sell their cars for less during “sales events” than they do at any other time. I point this out so that you don’t rush your buying decision. If you don’t buy a car during the tight time constraints of a phony sales event, you can negotiate just as good a price the next day. The exceptions to this are legitimate rebates offered by the manufacturer. These often expire at the end of the month which is one reason why the “last day of the month” really can be the best time to buy a car”.


(2) This is the out-the-door price, plus FEES. Every car dealer I know of adds (except me) raises the price he gives you by tacking on multiple PHONEY FEES, disguised asgovernment fees. Many buyers never realize that the total price includes an average of over $1,000 (as much as $3,000) in hidden added profit to the dealer. Customers don’t know this because the paperwork you sign when you think you’re buying the car is not a legal document (vehicle buyer’s order), but a worksheet. You sign the legal documents in the F&I or business office when the law requires disclosure of non-government fees. These are hidden in the fine print along with lots of other fine print that nobody reads. Most buyers assume that the big increase in the price they thought they were paying is from sales tax and license-registration government fees. The names of these fees disguise them to make you think they’re paid to the government…electronic filing fee, e-filing fee, doc or documentary fee, tag agency fee, etc.

(3) “The Price I’m giving you is only good for today”. If a salesman or sales manager tells you that, it is probably only a tactic to push you into buying the car. The only exception would be the expiration of a factory rebate. Once again, this is simply a tactic to push you into buying before you have a chance to do your comparative price shopping.

(4) “Take the car home tonight and see how you like it”. Driving the car you are considering buying home can be a good thing. It will give you a lot better idea about how the car performs, etc. However, there are two reasons the car salesman offers this. One is that you must leave the vehicle you might be trading in with the car dealer. This means that you cannot shop prices with other dealers. The second reason is the psychological impact of parking that new car in your driveway where your family and neighbors can see it. The slang expression for this is “the puppy dog”. If you were to take home a little puppy from the pet store, you and your children would fall in love with her and could not return her the next day.

(5) “You must give me a deposit before I can give you a price”. This must be one of the most insulting ways that some car salesmen have of intimidating a prospective buyer. It’s amazing how many people succumb to this which allows the salesman an element of control…. you can’t leave until they give you your money back. If confronted with this ultimatum, simply walk away.
“Are you ready to buy a car today”? Often, if you say no to this question, the salesman will tell you to come back when you are ready to buy. He will tell you to shop around and come back with your best price so that he can beat it. The salesman is afraid that, if he does give you his best price, you will go somewhere else and that salesman will beat it. Of course, that is the whole idea of competition and that is exactly what you want to do. If the salesman is afraid to give you a price because his competitor will beat it, it must not be the best price!


(6) “Make me an offer and I will take it to my manager for approval”. This is a very common tactic which you have probably already encountered. It is not unethical. It is simply part of negotiating. I point this out so that you are fully aware that this is part of the negotiating game. Be aware, that no matter what price you offer, the manager will ask you for more money. Even if you offered a high price that would be a very large profit for the dealer, the manager would ask you for more money. The psychology behind this is that if you suddenly accepted the offer, you may frighten the customer by thinking he had offered too much (which he would have). When you negotiate, you must be well versed on what is a good price for that car. Start out below the best price you think you can buy it for. If you cannot negotiate a price close to your best price, get up and leave. Continue this process with another car dealer.

(7) The “really big” discount. The other day a friend showed me direct mail advertising piece from a new car dealer with a coupon good for $2,000 discount on any car in his inventory. This is very common for newspaper and TV ads too. Federal law requires new cars to have a price sticker on the window named the Monroney label. A discount from this suggested retail price gives you a fair basis for comparison. Unfortunately, most car dealers today, increase the suggested retail price substantially with the use of an addendum to the Monroney sticker often referred to as a “Market Adjustment Addendum”. This “adjustment” can be several thousands of dollars. Be sure you know what the asking price is for the car when you have been offered a “big discount”.

(8) The” really big” trade-in allowance. Car salesmen are trained to seek out your “hot button”. Some car buyers are focused on how much the car dealer will offer for his trade-in. It’s very easy to offer you more for your trade-in than it’s truly worth by simply inflating the price of the car you’re buying by hidden fees, dealer installed accessories, or by simply inflating the MSRP.

(9) The “very low” monthly payment. Everybody is a “sucker” for a low monthly payment. That’s why leasing is so popular today. We budget all our spending around our weekly or monthly salaries. It’s easy for us to overlook the fact that it’s not only the amount of the monthly payment but the total number of payments and the down payment hidden in the fine print that counts.

(10) Just $100 above “dealer invoice”. Webster defines “Invoice” as the price the buyer pays to the seller. It should be ILLEGAL for manufacturers and car dealers to label the document that they send car dealers when they sell them a new vehicle as an invoice. THE INVOICE IS NOT THE SELLING PRICE BY THE MANUFACTURER TO THE DEALER. The invoice conceals multiple hidden kick-backs to the dealer by innocuous names like holdback, dealer incentive, advertising fee, floorplan assistance, etc. A car dealer averages thousands of dollars of kick-backs on each vehicle invoice he buys. Many dealers sell most of their new vehicles below invoice. Interestingly many manufacturers don’t allow their dealers to advertise prices on new cars below dealer invoice. One could conjecture that this may have the effect of artificially inflating the fair market price of new vehicles.

(11) “We want to buy your used car”. First, let me say that car dealers do like to buy used cars from the public; it’s not always a ruse to sell you a new car. Dealers like to buy used cars from you because they can buy them for much less than they must pay at the auto auction where other car dealers are competing to buy the same vehicle. However, most advertisements that you see (especially direct mail) are just trying to trick you into coming into the dealership so they can sell you another new or used car.

The best protection from all the above is to find a car dealer that you can trust. Ask your friends about their experiences with dealers and call the Better Business Bureau and the County Office of Consumer Affairs. Check the dealers’ Google rankings. A good tip on reading Google rankings is to ignore the “5 stars and “0 stars”. Read the 3- and 4-star ratings. They’re likely to be more real and thoughtful. All things being equal choose the dealership that has been in business a longer time and an owner or general manager who will make himself accessible to you and all his customers.

Monday, August 26, 2019

THE BOX: Car Dealers’ New, Major Profit Center

Okay, you've just bought that new or used car and the pressure is off…right? WRONG! The next step for the car dealer is to get you into the “box”. You won’t hear this word mentioned. It’s inside car dealer slang for the F&I (finance and insurance) office or the business office. This is the place that you sign all those papers making the sale legal and final. But in addition to that, it’s also a very important profit center for car dealers. In most car dealerships it’s the most profitable department. It’s not uncommon for car dealers to make an additional $2,000 profit or more in “the box” on each car they sell.

In the last few years, the average profit margins on new and used cars has narrowed. This is for a variety of reasons including the knowledge explosion (Google), the Internet, big data, third party car-buying sources like Costco and TrueCar, and the pressure from the auto manufacturers on dealers to increase their sales volume. Maybe the single biggest pressure on car profit margins is the education and sophistication of the 21st century consumer. The biggest auto retailer in the world is AutoNation. Because they were losing money selling new cars, they made the decision over a year ago to raise new car prices even though this cost them volume. They also made the decision to emphasize profits from the sale of “products” like extended warranties and the “interest spread” in their Finance and Insurance departments, aka THE BOX.

Here’s how that profit is generated. First and usually foremost is making money on the interest they charge you. Essentially, they make money on “the spread” just like banks make money when they loan it. For example, a car dealer will borrow money from Bank of America for 2.9% and loan it to you for 5.9%, or whatever interest rate they can convince you to accept. The second way they earn that big profit in “the box” is by selling you “products” which are added to the price of the car you just bought. There are many products and some of the most common are extended service warranties, maintenance plans, road hazard insurance, GAP insurance, window etch, and LoJack.

The way you should protect yourself on the interest rate is to have already shopped your own bank or credit union and two other banks for the best interest rate you can qualify for. Never go into “the box” without knowing what the best rate other banks or credit unions will allow you. The best way to protect yourself against the products they will try to sell you is to completely understand each product. Do you need an extended warranty on your new car? If this product costs $1,900 for example, how long are you going to keep the car and how long are you likely to be driving it when it’s out of the manufacturer’s warranty? Ask the same questions of each product they try to sell you. If you are unclear on the merits of a product, don’t commit. You can always go home, think about, and seek advice from friends and advisors.

Another important tactic is to never go into “the box” alone. If it’s just you and the F&I manager [often called business manager], and there’s a dispute over what was said, it’s just your word against his. Also, having a friend or advisor present will usually be a deterrent to any attempted deception.

These are some of the kinds of deception you should be on the lookout for. Tying the sale of a product like an extended service contract to the interest rate or eligibility to have the bank finance your car is illegal. But this practice happens all too often behind the closed doors of the “the box.” The F&I manger may tell you that the bank “requires” you to buy the extended warranty, GAP insurance another product in order to protect the bank’s collateral. This is simply a lie and it’s illegal for banks or car dealers to do this. Another common form of deception is to simply not disclose the products or interest rate, and have you sign the contract without reading it. There are many documents to be signed after you buy a car. Buyers are often in a state of euphoria now that they have bought their dream car and are in too much of a hurry to sign everything and drive their new car home. The car dealer is required by law to give you a signed copy of the installment sales contract. Be sure you carefully read it and be sure have a copy. If you don’t get a copy, you may find that you signed a different contract than the one you read.

Extended service warranties, GAP insurance, and other insurance products are regulated in Florida unlike many other states. This affords you some degree of protection like being able to cancel an insurance product if you did not use it. In Florida, you can do this in 60 days for a 100% cancellation. You don’t get the cash back and your monthly payment won’t go down however. But the amount is taken off the principal amount you are financing through the bank. You cancel insurance products after 60 days, but the cancellation is not pro rata and you pay a large penalty.

If you remember nothing else from this article, please remember one thing. Do not hurry the process of financing your car and signing the papers. Don’t let the car dealer pressure you into signing anything you don’t understand. Time is on your side because it will allow you to think and to consult with others who can help you make your final decision. I get a lot of calls from victims of “the box” and the one thing they all have in common is that they let themselves be rushed into signing the documents so that they could drive their dream car home that same day.

Monday, August 19, 2019

Dealing with Hidden Fees (aka Dealer Fees)

Hopefully by now, all but my newest readers know about the infamous “Dealer Fees”. If you don’t know, they’re hidden price increases on the car you purchase disguised to look like a federal, state, or local tax or fee. It’s 100% profit to the dealer. “Dealer Fee” is the most common name for this disguised profit, but they go by many names such as doc fee, dealer prep fee, service fee, administrative fee, electronic filing fee, e-filing fee, tag agency fee, pre-delivery fee, etc. The names are only limited by car dealers’ imaginations. Almost all car dealers in Florida charge a Dealer Fee. The dealer fees range from around $700 to as high as $2,000!

This is the Florida law that is supposed to regulate the Dealer Fee: “The advertised price must include all fees or charges that the customer must pay excluding state and local taxes.” The law also requires that the Dealer Fee must be disclosed to the buyer as follows: “This charge represents costs and profits to the dealer for items such as inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting vehicles and preparing documents related to the sale.”

This law is very weak and almost never enforced. When enforced, it isn’t enforced by the letter of the law; it’s done so as to “accommodate” the car dealers. The law is “weak” because it requires only that the dealer fees be included in the “advertised” price. The word “advertised” is narrowly interpreted to mean a specific car shown in a newspaper, TV, radio, or online ad, but, what about when you get a price on the phone, online, or from the salesman? You don’t find out about the Dealer Fee until you’re in the business office signing a bunch of papers. The dealers get around advertisements very easily by including a “number” in the fine print. This number is their stock number that designates one specific car. When you respond to the ad, this car is no longer available (sales people are usually not paid a commission for selling the “ad car). The advertisement might say “many more identical cars are available.” It’s true that identical cars are available for sale, but they are not available for sale at the sale price because they are not the advertised stock number car. If you buy one of those “exact same cars” you will pay from $700 to $2,000 more.

The reason I’m told that the law is rarely enforced is that the Florida Attorney General’s office is understaffed and too busy enforcing other Florida laws. I’m also told that Florida car buyers don’t file very many complaints against car dealers for violating the Dealer Fee law. I don’t believe that there can be too many other infractions of the law that take more money annually from consumers than dealer fees take from car buyers. Just one car dealer selling 1,000 cars a year and charging a $1,000 dealer fee is taking a $1 million annually from car buyers. Most car dealers in South Florida sell a lot more than 1,000 cars annually and many charge more than $1,000 dealer fee. I believe that the reason more complaints aren’t filed on the dealer fee is because most car buyers don’t know that they are being duped. They either don’t notice the fee or assume it’s an official federal or state fee. Dealer often tell their customers that all dealers charge it and that it’s required by law…not true.

The Attorney General also “accommodates” the dealers by not interpreting the law the way it was intended. For example, the law says that the dealer fee must be included in the advertised price. The Florida Senate has ruled that the law requires that the fee be “included” rather than “specifically delineated.” But the Attorney General allows car dealers to advertise car prices without including their dealer fees in the price if they mention their dealer fees in the fine print. They also allow car dealers to simply state in the fine print that they have a Dealer Fee but not even mention the amount. To me they are simply allowing the car dealers to break the law.

Lastly, the required disclosure of the Dealer Fee on the vehicle buyer’s order or invoice is confusing, misleading, and incorrect: “This charge represents costs and profits to the dealer for items such as inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting vehicles and preparing documents related to the sale.” It should not say “costs” because any cost that you pass along to the customer in the price of a product is pure profit. A dealer can pass along his utility bills, sales commissions and advertising if he wants to and call it a “dealer fee”. It should not say “inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting vehicles” because all car dealers are reimbursed by the manufacturer for “inspecting, cleaning, and adjusting vehicles”.

So, what should you do when you are confronted by a car dealer with the “Dealer Fee”? Besides “LEAVE”, here are some suggestions that may help you:

(1) Make it clear from the very beginning that all prices you discuss must be “out-the-door” prices. This way you don’t care if the dealer fee added up front because you will shop and compare their bottom-line price with at least 3 competing car dealers. Ideally you should require that they include tax and tag in that price. If you don’t, they might try to slip in something they call the “electronic filing fee” or “e filing fee” and trick you into believing it’s part of the license tag and registration.

(2) The dealer will often tell you that all car dealers charge Dealer Fees and that they are required by law to add the dealer fee on every car they sell. Simply tell them that you know this is not true and you can cite me and other car dealers like OffLeaseOnly.com who do not charge dealer fees. Print out a copy of this article, show it to them, and tell them that you know that there is no law that says he must charge you a dealer fee.

(3) As long as you and the dealer understand that the out-the-door price is the price you will shop and compare with his competition, you don’t need to be concerned whether there is a dealer fee showing on the vehicle buyer’s order. To be competitive, the dealer can simply reduce the price by the amount of his Dealer Fee and the bottom line is what you are comparing. You can download a legal form,www.OutTheDoorPriceAffidavit.com, that you ask the car dealer to sign before you sign the vehicle buyer’s order. The dealer legally commits that the price he quoted or advertised is an honest out-the-door price. If he won’t sign this affidavit, than you won’t sign the buyer’s order.

(4) Be aware that dealers usually do not pay their sales people a commission on the amount of their dealer fee. In fact, dealers often misinform their sales people just like they do their customers. The salesman who tells you that the all dealers charge Dealer Fees and that the law requires everyone pay a dealer fee may believe it. Sale people who understand that the Dealer Fee is simply profit to the dealer will be resentful of not being paid their 25% commission on it. A $1,000 dealer fee costs the salesman $250 in commission.

(5) When you respond to an advertisement at a specific price for a specific model car, object when the dealer adds the dealer fee. Unfortunately, the law allows him the loophole of claiming that the ad car is a different stock number, but you might be able to shame him into taking off the dealer fee. If you raise a “big enough stink”, the dealer would be smart to take off the dealer fee than claim that technicality, especially if you were to advise the local TV station or newspaper.

I hope that these suggestions help you and I hope that you will file a complaint with the Florida Attorney General, Ashley Moody. If enough consumers (who are also voters) let our elected officials know how they feel about Dealer Fees, it will bring positive results.

Monday, August 12, 2019

Why Your Car Dealership Won’t Tell You the Price

I’m sure that you noticed that the last time you went car shopping you were unable to get a firm price on the car…unless you were willing to sign on the dotted line and put down a deposit. It’s impossible to get a firm price on a car over the telephone, in person, and very difficult to get one online. If the salesman agrees to give you a price, it excludes hidden fees and dealer installed accessories. If on the off chance you’ve never bought a car, or haven’t bought one in a long time, try this. Call any car dealership and ask for a price on a specific year, make, and model. I can almost guarantee that you won’t be able to get an honest, firm price.

Have you ever wondered why you can get a firm price on just about any other product except an automobile? You can call a jewelry store and get a price on a diamond ring that costs as much or more than a car. You can go on Amazon.com, get a firm price, and buy virtually anything. Walk in or call any department store and they give you a firm, out-the-door price.

Car dealers don’t want to give you a firm price because they want to deprive you of a fundamental right of our American free-market economy, which is to be able to shop and compare prices so that you can choose the lowest one. There are some countries where the prices are dictated by the government or giant cartels. We have anti-trust laws in America that prohibit price fixing, monopolies, or collusion between companies which keep prices artificially high.

In fact, there’s even a federal law that says auto manufacturers must put a sticker on all vehicles that discloses the Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price, MSRP. This law was written by Senator Mike Monroney back in 1958. Senator Monroney felt there was a need for this law because, before then, car dealers could ask any price they wanted for car. They could put their own price sticker on their cars and mark their cost up any amount they chose. A car-buyer, pre-1958, had absolutely no basis for comparing prices between competing car dealers. The MSRP gave every car shopper a common basis for comparing discounts from MSRP. All dealers pay their manufacturers the same price for a car and all MSRP’s for a specific year-make-model have the same percentage markup. The Monroney label was a great idea and it worked well for a while, but it wasn’t too long before the car dealers figured out ways around this “handicap” to their profit margins.

The easiest way around an MSRP is simply to refuse to give the customer a firm discount unless they agree to buy the car, and therefore you can’t get a price from a car dealer until then. Another way is to give you a firm discount but add hidden charges like dealer fees, doc fees, electronic filing fees, or dealer installed accessories after you agree on the discount from MSRP. “Bait and switch” is a popular tactic which simply brings you in to buy a specific car only to find out that its “just been sold” …but here’s another one almost like it”. Another popular tactic is to advertise discounts from “list price”, “dealer list price”, or “sticker price”. Dealers even have counterfeit Monroney labels printed that they display alongside of the real Monroney label. These counterfeit price stickers I’ve named “Phony Monroney’s”. I’ve seen advertisements from a South Florida car dealer, advertising “$10,500 Discounts on Every Vehicle in Stock”. The discounts aren’t from the MSRP but from “dealer list” which is clearly thousands of dollars above MSRP.

The best defense against all of this is to insist on an out-the-door price. The definition of an out-the-door price is “the full amount paid to the dealer plus government fees (tax and tag) only. Explain the following to the sales manager at the car dealership. “If you give me an honest out-the-door price, I will compare it with the two prices I already have from two other car dealerships. I will buy from the dealer with the lowest price. If you agree to give me your best price, you have a 33% chance of selling me a car. If you refuse to give me a price right now, you have 0% chance of selling me a car, because I will walk out that front door and you will never see me or hear from me again.” You can accomplish the same thing over the telephone or via email. You can download a form for the dealership to sign to guarantee this price at www.OutTheDoorPriceAffidavit.com. If the dealership refuses to sign this, they aren’t being honest about giving you their lowest price. Buy your car elsewhere.

I also recommend that you try www.TrueCar.com in addition to the tactic I just described. By way of full disclosure, I’m a TrueCar dealer, I own stock in TrueCar, and was member of the TrueCar national dealer council for three years. Another good third-party buying source is www.CostcoAuto.com. Costco requires an annual membership fee of $65 which is well worth the investment.

Monday, August 05, 2019

Minimizing the Pain of Having Your Car Serviced

The pain of buying a used or new car may be greater than the pain of having it serviced, but you need to have it serviced far more often than you must buy a car. Below, I’m listing nine suggestions to make your visit to your car dealer’s or independent service department as pleasant as possible.

(1) If you decide to have your vehicle serviced by a dealership rather than an independent, choose the dealer with the best service department, not necessarily the dealer you purchased your vehicle from. You don’t have to have the same dealership service your car that sold you your car. You probably bought your car from the dealer who gave you the best price. You should have your car serviced at the dealer who can best maintain and repair your car. Your manufacturer doesn’t require that you have recommended maintenance done by their dealers, but you should keep receipts from the independent you choose to prove you had it done in the event of a warranty claim. You must have warranty repairs done by the dealer. The price of service is important, but secondary to the quality of the service and repairs. Do a little research. Ask friends and neighbors who drive your make of car. Check with the BBB and the County Office of Consumer Affairs. Ask the service manager at the dealership to show you his factory score on CSI (customer satisfaction index). Every manufacturer surveys dealers’ service customers and ranks that dealer by how well he treats his customers. Many auto manufacturers are measuring service satisfaction by the percentage of customers that return to their dealer for service, Service Retention. This is the most accurate measure of how well your dealer will service and repair your car.


(2) Establish a personal relationship with your service advisor. The person in the service drive who writes up your repair order is very important. Be sure you get a good one. He should be knowledgeable, attentive to your needs, promptly return phone calls, and recommend only necessary services. You might not find this person on your first visit, but if you aren’t comfortable with the person you are dealing with, ask for one with whom you are. When you make an appointment to have your car serviced, always ask for that service advisor.

(3) Don’t pay the “gotcha”, miscellaneous supplies fee. Almost all car dealers and independents tack on a phony fee when you pay your bill which is simply more profit to the dealer but is disguised by various labels. It’s sometimes called “environmental impact fee”, “sundry shop supplies” and many others. The service cashier just adds a percentage ranging from 5% to 10% to your bill. This is no different than the “hidden dealer fee” that the sales department tacked on to the price they quoted you on the price of the car. Most dealers will waive this fee if you complain about it, especially if you threaten to call the BBB, their manufacturer, or the Florida Attorney General’s office.

(4) Always road test your car, preferably with the technician. If you brought your car in for a drivability problem such as a noise, vibration, or pulling to the right or left, don’t accept the car back until you ride in the car with the technician or service advisor and confirm that the problem has been remedied. I also recommend that you drive the car with the service advisor to demonstrate the problem when you bring it in. His experiencing what you experience always communicates your problem more accurately than listening to your description of the problem. If your problem is a troublesome “noise” which the technician or service advisor cannot hear, but your do, insist on someone else driving with you who has better hearing.

(5) Ask for a written estimate of the total cost of repairs and maintenance. Florida law requires that the dealer give you a written estimate. By law, they may not exceed this by more than 10%.

(6) Make an appointment ahead of time. You should insist on making an appointment and you should try to make that appointment at a time when the dealer’s service department will be least busy…typically the middle of the afternoon on weekdays or Saturday and Sunday. Avoid the 7:30-8:00 morning rush. When your service advisor has written up your repair order, ask him how long it will take. After he tells you, ask him to let you know ahead of time if, for any unforeseen reason, your car will not be ready in the promised time. Often times when you call a service department they will tell you to “bring the car in anytime” or “come right over”. Service advisors will tell you this because they are either too busy or too lazy to take the time to make a proper appointment. When they tell you this, tell them that your time is very valuable and that you insist on an appointment at a time when they can get you in and out quickly. Always write down the name of the person that gave you the appointment.

(7) Shop and compare high cost repair prices. Most service departments are competitive on maintenance items like oil changes, wheel alignments, and tire rotations. However, the costs of major repairs can vary considerably. If you are looking at an air-conditioner, transmission, or engine repair that can cost several thousands of dollars, get bids from more than one service department. Often just suggesting that you will do this will keep the cost down from the dealership you prefer.

(8) Introduce yourself to the service manager. This falls along the same philosophy as developing a good personal relationship with your service advisor. It can’t hurt to know the “boss”. If you are on first name basis with the service manager, it just might earn you a slightly higher level of treatment from those that work for him.

(9) DO NOT BUY ANY SERVICE THAT IS NOT RECOMMENDED BY THE MANUFACTURER. Modern cars require far less maintenance than cars built ten years ago. Car dealers and independents are suffering from the small amount of factory recommended maintenance. To supplement this, they are inventing unneeded maintenance under the guise of dealer recommended maintenance. Be sure that you carefully review your car’s owner’s manual each time you bring your car in for routine service. Be especially careful not to buy “FLUSHES” of the radiator, transmission, fuel system, power steering, engine oil and brake fluid. These are inventions of the dealer and independent service departments to make money and are not recommended by your car’s manufacturer.

Monday, July 29, 2019

Car Dealers Make More Money Financing Your Car than Selling it


OK, you’ve just bought that new or used car and the pressure is off…right? WRONG! The next step for the car dealer is to get you into the “box”. You won’t hear this word mentioned. It’s inside car dealer slang for the F&I office or the business office. This is the place that you sign all those papers making the sale legal and final. But in addition to that, it’s also a very important profit center for car dealers. In most car dealerships it’s the most profitable department. It’s not uncommon for car dealers to make over $1,500 in “the box” on each car they sell. AutoNation, the world’s largest auto retailer makes over $2,000.

The auto manufacturers put a lot of pressure on their dealers to sell more new cars. Dealers have minimum quotas that they must meet or exceed. If they don’t, they can be penalized by losing large cash bonus rewards. To ensure that they don’t lose these bonuses, dealers are being forced to price new cars so low that many dealers are losing money in their new car departments. This puts even more pressure on car dealers to make up for the lost new car profits by increasing their finance department’s profits.

Here’s how that profit is generated. First, and usually foremost, is making money on the interest they charge you. Essentially, they make money on “the spread” just like banks make money when they loan it. For example, a car dealer will borrow money from Bank of America for 3% and loan it to you for 5% or whatever interest rate they can convince you to accept. The second way they earn that big profit in “the box” is by selling you “products” which are added to the price of the car you just bought. There are many products and some of the most common are extended service warranties, maintenance plans, road hazard insurance, GAP insurance, window etch, and LoJack. 


The way you should protect yourself on the interest rate is to have already shopped your own bank or credit union and two other banks for the best interest rate you can qualify for. Never go into “the box” without knowing what the best rate other banks or credit unions will allow you. The best way to protect yourself against the products they will try to sell you is to completely understand each product. Do you want or need an extended warranty on your new car? If this product costs $1,900 for example, how long are you going to keep the car and how long are you likely to be driving it when it’s out of the manufacturer’s warranty? Ask the same questions of each product they try to sell you. If you’re unclear on the merits of a product, don’t commit. You can always go home and think about and seek advice from friends and advisors. If the finance manager tells you that you must decide immediately, just leave. He’s not being honest.

Another important tactic is to never go into “the box” alone. If it’s just you and the F&I manager [often called business manager], and there is a dispute over what was said, it’s just your word against his. Also, having a friend or advisor present will usually be a deterrent to any attempted deception. 


These are some of the kinds of deception you should be on the lookout for. Tying the sale of a product, like an extended service contract, to the interest rate or the bank’s willingness to approve your financing is illegal. But this practice happens all too often behind the closed doors of the “the box.” The F&I manger may tell you that the bank “requires” you to buy the extended warranty, GAP insurance another product to protect the bank’s collateral. This is simply a lie. Another common form of deception is to not disclose the products or interest rate, and have you sign the contract without reading it. There are many documents to be signed after you buy a car. Buyers are often in a state of euphoria now that they have bought their dream car and are in too much of a hurry to sign everything and drive their new car home. The car dealer is required by law to give you a signed copy of the installment sales contract. Be sure you carefully read it, and be sure have a copy. If you don’t get a copy, you may find that you signed a different contract than the one you read. 


Extended service warranties, GAP insurance, and other insurance products are regulated in Florida unlike many other states. This affords you some degree of protection like being able to cancel an insurance product if you did not use it. You can do this in 60 days for a 100% cancellation. You don’t get the cash back and your monthly payment won’t go down, but the amount is taken off the principal amount you are financing through the bank. You can cancel insurance products after 60 days, but the cancellation is not pro rata and you pay a large penalty. 


If you remember nothing else from this article, please remember this one thing. Don’t hurry the process of financing your car and signing the papers. Don’t let the car dealer encourage you to sign anything you don’t understand. Time is on your side because it will allow you to think and to consult with others who can help you make your final decision. I get a lot of calls from victims of “the box” and the one thing they all have in common is that they let themselves be rushed into signing the documents so that they could drive their dream car home that same day.