Monday, July 15, 2019

Deaths from Dangerous Recalls Are the fault of our Legislators

Clearly auto manufacturers are partly to blame for the millions of vehicles on our highways with unfixed, dangerous recalls, like Takata airbags that explode in the driver’s face like a hand grenade. But the auto makers didn’t build cars with dangerous problems on purpose; it was a mistake.

Our lawmakers could get virtually all these cars repaired very quickly just by passing a law to make it ILLEGAL TO SELL A VEHICLE WITH A DANGEROUS RECALL. Their lack of action on this issue is not a mistake; it’s premeditated to enhance their chances of reelection.

You may be thinking that the auto makers are doing all they can because they issue recall notices to drivers and will fix their cars free when the owner brings it to one of their dealers. One wonders how many recalls would be issued if they weren’t required to do so by the National Highway Traffic Safety Association, NHTSA.

The reason that recalls don’t solve the problem is that only 1 out of 4 recalled cars is ever fixed. That’s because most drivers of recalled vehicles are unaware that their vehicles have been recalled and many procrastinate or just don’t care enough to have it fixed. Also, there are hundreds of thousands of recalled cars for which there’s no fix available.

Older recalled cars are often the most dangerous, especially those recalled for defective Takata airbags that become more dangerous over time. A driver of a 2010 used Honda could easily be the second, third or even fourth owner. The chances of that owner receiving a recall notice in the mail are slim. When the car was purchased new, there was no recall. When the car was subsequently sold by used car dealers, there was almost certainly no disclosure made to the buyer. Most states don’t require the disclosure. When and if a disclosure is made, it’s usually buried in the fine print. Yes, this information is available to buyers online via CarFax, NHTSA, and the manufacturers, but the reality is that very, very few used car buyers avail themselves of this.

I’ve mystery shopped dozens and dozens of car dealerships in South Florida over the last three years and virtually everyone is selling cars with dangerous recalls and no disclosure. Many car salesmen lie about the recall, saying there is no recall, or the recall was fixed. Many tell the buyer that all she must do is take it the new car dealer and have it fixed when he knows there is no fix available. You can read these mystery shopping reports at http://www.mysteryshoppingreports.com/.

The auto manufacturers and car dealers are fully aware of all the above, but if they voluntarily refused to sell a recalled car to a customer it would have a significant negative economic impact. The auto manufacturers and many of the car dealerships (AutoNation, CarMax, Penske, Sonic) are publicly owned companies. A public company has a fiduciary responsibility to their stockholders to make a profit by every legal means. Mike Jackson, then CEO of AutoNation, made the right and moral decision not to retail used cars with defective recalls to its customers. After a year of declining used car profits and outcries from stockholders, he reluctantly began retailing these dangerous cars.

The only way to get these dangerous vehicles off the road, fixed and safely back on the road is for our federal and state legislators to make it illegal to sell a vehicle with a defective recall. This is almost laughably simple and obvious. It’s also sadly simple and obvious that the only reason they don’t is because they will lose the financial support for reelection from the auto makers and auto dealers.

Monday, July 08, 2019

Should I Pay Cash for My Next Car or Finance It?

Most people don’t have any choice except to finance their cars. However, if you are reading this column, the chances are you’re in that fortunate higher demographic income group and can afford to pay cash for your next car. People who read newspaper columns and blogs tend to be more intelligent and affluent. But, just because you can, is it the right move?

Many people think they can get a better deal on a car if they pay cash. This was true 50 years ago before dealers discovered the new profit center referred to as the Finance and Insurance Department aka “Business Office”. Today this is not true. In fact, paying cash may even make the actual vehicle cost you more! The reason for this is that car dealers make money when they handle the financing with the bank or with the manufacturer’s lenders like Honda Finance, Chrysler Credit or normal banks like Wells Fargo or Capitol One. A dealer typically averages about $4,000 on every car he handles the financing on. Therefore, if the dealer’s minimum acceptable profit on the car’s markup was $1,000, he may sell it to someone who he could make $4,000 finance profit on for less than someone who he knew was a cash buyer. Dealers will sometimes sell a car for zero profit or even lose money on the car because they can make a good profit on the financing.

If you plan on paying cash for your next car, my recommendation is DO NOT TELL THE CAR DEALER THIS. Tell the car dealer that that you are considering financing with him. This will help you get a lower price because the dealer still has hope that he can make money when he finances our car. The average profit a car dealer makes financing cars is much larger than he makes marking up the selling price. AutoNation, the world’s largest retailer of new vehicles, made the decision about one year ago to increase their new vehicle prices because they were losing money in their new car departments. They were always very profitable in their finance and insurance departments…averaging over $2,000 per vehicle on every car sold. In fact, they’ve focused more on increasing profits in the finance department even more with “branded products” …AutoNation GAP insurance, Auto Nation Maintenance Plan, AutoNation Extended Warranty, etc.

My second recommendation is check interest rates and terms with your own bank or credit union before you talk to the car dealer’s finance people. The finance manager (aka business manager) is on commission and paid a generous percentage of the profit he makes by marking up the bank’s interest rates and selling you extra “products” like extended warranties, GAP insurance, and car maintenance.

One argument in favor of financing a car is being able to keep your money invested, and earning a greater return than your interest cost of financing. There has never been a never time in our history that this is true. The bad news is that interest rates are not only at historical lows for borrowing but also for CD’s and interest income. With very good credit, you can finance a new car today for between 3% and 4%, but you can’t find a short federally insured CD for that amount. However, you can find secure equity and bond investments that will earn considerably more than your cost of interest on financing a car.

There is one very important intangible reason why some people should pay cash for their car. That intangible is called “peace of mind”. My older brother, Doug, grew up during the Great Depression. When he built his new house, he paid cash for it. I couldn’t believe this and was severely critical of him. It was entirely illogical for him to pay cash when he could get a very low interest rate and home mortgage interest is tax deductible. His investments earned him far more than the interest rate on his mortgage would cost. After a while I finally realized why Doug was right and I was wrong. He paid cash for his home because it made him feel better. Growing up in the thirties, like many of my customers did, made an indelible impression on his emotions. Owning his home with no debt made him feel happy and secure and what could be more important than that?

Monday, July 01, 2019

Should You Exercise Your Option to Buy Your Leased Car?

One of the advantages of leasing is your option to buy the car at the end of your lease at the “residual” price. The residual is what the leasing company “guessed” your car would be worth at the end of your lease. They guessed because nobody has a crystal ball that tells them exactly what a used car will be worth 3 or 4 years in the future. If they guessed low, you have an opportunity. If they guessed high, you have no obligation; it’s the leasing company’s problem and they must sell the car and take a loss.

The best thing about making this decision is that you’re holding the best hand in the card game between you, the leasing company, and the dealer. That’s because you know your car better than they do. You’ve probably been driving it for close to three years, you know how well you’ve maintained it, how worn the tires are, whether it’s been wrecked and repaired, and how many dings, dents, or upholstery stains there are. You know if it was garaged, how carefully you drove it and the exact mileage. You also know, better than anybody, how well it runs. All these things determine the value of your car.

Unless you buy a new car, you can’t have as much confidence in any other used car that you buy as your own used leased car. The only assurance that you have when you buy somebody else’s used car is their word, or the dealer’s word, about how it was driven and maintained. A CarFax report offers good information, but it’s not 100% reliable. That means if you did take very good care of your leased car, drove it carefully, kept it in a garage, waxed and washed it faithfully, maintained it carefully and didn’t put too many miles on it, it’s worth more to you than anybody else. That’s because you’re the only one who knows that. And you can never be sure about that for any other used car you might buy.

Given that you like your leased car and want to keep it, the next step is determining the current wholesale market value for your car. Car dealers call this the “ACV”, for actual cash value. Check the Internet for information on the value of your car. The best check on the wholesale value is to drive your car to 3 or 4 car dealerships that are franchised for your make. If you drive a Ford, visit as many Ford dealerships as you can and tell them you want to sell your car. You aren’t misleading them because it’s a lease car. You could exercise your option to buy it from the leasing company and then resell it to the dealer, if the dealer’s offer was higher. If you live near a CarMax store, the largest retailer of used cars anywhere, they buy a lot of used cars “over the curb” and their prices are often competitive. Be sure you get a quote from them. Two other sources for an accurate wholesale market value of your car are www.Carvana.com and www.WeBuyAnyCar.com. You can get an online estimate from each of these companies and they will also give you a firm cash offer when they see your car.

Now that you’re armed with the actual market value for your car, you can compare it with the residual value in your lease contract, the price you have an option to buy it for. You might get lucky and be able to sell your car to a dealer, www.WeBuyAnyCar.com, CarMax, or www.Carvana.com for more than your option price. If so, you can flip the car for a fast profit. It’s not unheard of to make $1,000 or more by doing this. If you want to keep your leased car, you should be sure that your option price is less than, or very close to the true wholesale market value. If not, you’re better off to give the leased car back to the leasing company and buy similar used car at a lower price. Car dealers, of course, mark up the wholesale value of their used cars by anywhere from $1,000 to $4,000+, so even if your option price is $1,000 or so above actual wholesale, it can still be good buy. Remember, you know that used car better than anybody and if you buy another used car, you don’t.